Shoptember Sidewalk Sale, Sept 4th-5th from 10am-4pm

Shoptember Sidewalk Sale, Sept 4th-5th from 10am-4pm

Ready, set, SHOPTEMBER! Don’t miss this 2 day sidewalk sale in Historic Downtown Venice and beyond on Friday, September 4th and Saturday, September 5th from 10am to 4pm. Shop local at over 100 locations and enjoy outdoor sidewalk browsing. Come by and see what you can find! Don’t forget to grab a delicious bite at one of our local downtown restaurants too. Participating locations include but are not limited to the following:

DOWNTOWN
B & B Bootery- 311 W. Venice Ave.
Bonnell’s Boutique and Winery- 101 W. Venice Ave.
Boutique by the Beach- 
Celebration Corner- 303A W. Venice Ave.
Ciao Gelato- 317A West Venice Ave.
Coldwell Banker Realty- Venice/Englewood- 331 W Venice Ave.
Crate & Marrow- 235 W. Miami Ave.
Dana Tyler Fashion Jewelry- 233 W. Venice Ave. 
Dick’s Shoes of Venice- 251 West Venice Ave.
Down Island Way Boutique- 225 W. Miami Ave.
Eyes On You- 140 W. Venice Ave.
Fifi’s of Venice- 112 Nokomis Ave
Heitel Jewelers- 347 W. Venice Ave.
Island Gift Nook- 227 W. Venice Ave. 
Island Life Hammock Co.- 329 W. Venice Ave. 
Lisa’s Classic Rose- 303B W. Venice Ave.
Luxurious Interiors- 205 W. Venice Ave.
Mother’s Cupboard Spice Shoppe- 208 W. Miami Ave.
Nana’s A Children’s Shop- 223 W Venice Ave.
Needlefish Yarns of Venice- 258 W. Miami Ave.
Patchington- 136 W. Venice Ave.
RE/MAX Platinum Realty- 307 W. Venice Ave.
Rose and Leo- 310 W. Venice Ave. 
Simply Venice by Laurie Jean and Co.- 317B W. Venice Ave.
southeast salt- 213 W. Venice Ave.
St. Marco Boutique- 239 W. Venice Ave. 
SunBug- 141 W. Venice Ave.
Tangi and Jess- 310 W. Venice Ave. 
Things I Like- 307 W. Venice Ave.
Twist Boutique- 137 W. Venice Ave. 
Venice In Vogue- 310 W. Venice Ave.

AND BEYOND
ReStore (Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County)- 1400 Ogden Road

Fifth Third Bank is New Gold Sponsor for Venice MainStreet

Fifth Third Bank is New Gold Sponsor for Venice MainStreet

Special thanks to Sandra DiPentima, Financial Center Manager of Fifth Third Bank in Venice, for facilitating a $5,000 Gold Sponsorship from Fifth Third Bank to support the efforts of Venice MainStreet. Sandra is Vice President of Venice MainStreet and is Chair of the Partnership Committee. For more information about Fifth Third Bank, visit 53.com.

Visit local branches at these locations:
273 S. Tamiami Trail Venice, FL 34285; (941) 488-8441
1340 East Venice Avenue Venice, FL 34292; (941) 485-9000
1641 Jacaranda Blvd. Venice, FL 34293; (941) 493-1600

About Fifth Third
Fifth Third Bancorp is a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the indirect parent company of Fifth Third Bank, National Association, a federally chartered institution. As of March 31, 2020, Fifth Third had $185 billion in assets and operated 1,123 full-service banking centers and 2,464 ATMs with Fifth Third branding in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, Georgia and North Carolina. In total, Fifth Third provides its customers with access to approximately 53,000 fee-free ATMs across the United States. Fifth Third operates four main businesses: Commercial Banking, Branch Banking, Consumer Lending and Wealth & Asset Management. Fifth Third is among the largest money managers in the Midwest and, as of March 31, 2020, had $374 billion in assets under care, of which it managed $42 billion for individuals, corporations and not-for-profit organizations through its Trust and Registered Investment Advisory businesses. Investor information and press releases can be viewed at www.53.com. Fifth Third’s common stock is traded on the Nasdaq® Global Select Market under the symbol “FITB.” Fifth Third Bank was established in 1858. Deposit and Credit products are offered by Fifth Third Bank, National Association. Member FDIC.

Fifth Third Bank social media handles:
Twitter: @FifthThird
LinkedIn: Fifth Third Bank, URL: linkedin.com/company/fifth-third-bank
Facebook: @FifthThirdBank
Instagram: @fifththirdbank

Venice MainStreet Appreciates Its Volunteers!

Venice MainStreet Appreciates Its Volunteers!

For many nonprofits in our area, the summer months are slow and lonely. For our organizations, including Venice MainStreet, the COVID-19 virus certainly pushed us into slower summer months earlier than expected. Venice MainStreet did not have the opportunity to say goodbye to many of its volunteers and did not host the annual volunteer appreciation celebration in late April to recognize the immense contributions and efforts our volunteers provide to the community through their service to Venice MainStreet.

We wanted to take the time to recognize these outstanding individuals and thank them for all they do throughout the year to lend assistance to Venice MainStreet and to help our wonderful town. Our volunteers donate their time providing information at the Centennial Park Kiosk in historic Downtown Venice, walking throughout the district as a downtown ambassador (Downtowner), special event support, committee work, administrative support, research and writing, plus our board of directors’ leadership.

Please take a moment, read these names, and know that these people truly care about the town that we live in and work to make it a better place. If you happen to see a name of a friend, take a moment to call or write and let them know you appreciate their service too! For more information about joining VMS or our volunteer program visit our website at VisitVeniceFL.org.

Geraldine Abraham
Raymond Abraham
Alan Adams
Lee Anderson
Barbara Bartz
Maria Baskin
Von Bear
John Birkinbine
Sarah Birkinbine
Terry Brennan
Lois Brickley
Rose Bridges
Andy Britton
Colleen Brown
Marie Buchanan
Deanna Burke
Betty Burkett
Terri Candida
Elise Carey
Patrick Carney
Viviane Chastain
Paula Chew
Mary Clark
Kevin Collins
Joe Colonnese
Pat Colonnese
Tobe Cookingham
Tom Cookingham
Linda Costanzo
Jane Coyne
Kathy Crisman
Deborah Currie
Raymond Czapiga
Alyssa Dalton
Marty Damon
Jerri DeKriek
Heidi DeMali
Sandra DiPentima
Tom Doherty
Dean Draper
Donna Draper
Lillian Duvall
Mary Eichenauer
Margo Emmons
Syd Emmons
Jennifer Endsley
Joan Evans
Barbara Feltquate
Ronnie Fernandez
Arlene Ferrick
Mitzi Fiedler
Roberta Fine
Lorraine Finizio
Nick Flerlage
Joe & Marilyn Fogerty
Joan Gardner
Hank Gesek
Jane Gilligan
Dee Glatz
Jane Goodman
Jeannie Gomes
Tom Gordon
Mike & Addy Griffith
Cleora Grossi
Jo Gruenwald
Sheila Haase
Dick Hale
Heather Hansen
Claire Harrison
Susan Hartrick
Barbara Hassell
John Hassell
Donna Hastings
Lara Hauswirth
Jan Hitt
Bonnie Hobgood
Kipper House
Jim Ingham
Larry Ivey
Tracy Ivey
Sonja Jordan-Mowery
Samuel King
Eileen Kocher
Virginia LaPlante
Carol Lehrman
Maria Leonardo
Cindy Lodge
Jim Lorenz
Renee MacDonald
Jane Madden
Debbie Mahle
Katie Malloy
Kathleen Malvaso
Marte Markwell
Cindy Marovich
Elaine Martone
Tony Martone
Pat Mazzola
Colleen McCrudden
Patricia McDermott
Poppy McDonald
Art & Doris McManus
Debbie Meola
Kay Montambo
Rod Nafziger
Linda Nelson
Ambrose Nolan
Janet Oberholtzer
Conway Otis
Carlene Painter
Nancy Parzych
Brad Patton
Scott Phillips
Kathleen Pickering
Shirley Pollack
Blair Post
Gaylen Pugh
Joyce Puglio
Mark Rawlinson
Sheila Reardon
Jerry Rehert
Lynn Remo
Audrey Riggs
Bob Roger
Jessica Rumschlag
Michael Santaspirt
Carol Sbabo
Melinda Schell
Patsy Scuzzo
Leah Sherman
Verna Silk
Sharon Silvers
Bette Simmons
Meryl Sonsini
Debbie Sugden
Clair Sullivan
Betty Symonds
Joan Thomas
Gail Thompson
Harry Thompson
Marilu Thornburgh
Jean Trammell
Dave & Ann Trexler
Linda Vaughn
Bob Vedder
Pam Vernon
Barbara Vitali
Mary Vlismas
Tom Voigt
Tony Weaver
Bill Willson
Chris Wilson
Christine Wilson
Dee Wright
John Worrall
Shirley Yawn
Jan Young
Susie Zavodnyik

New MainStreet Business Partner Big Bam eBikes: Changing the Way We Bike

New MainStreet Business Partner Big Bam eBikes: Changing the Way We Bike

Rentals, sales, repairs, and tours. Big Bam eBikes has it all. They offer quality electric bikes—bikes with an integrated electric motor that adds power to your ride—at affordable prices. From folding to comfort to trikes, they will find the right eBike for you. They can repair all types of bikes (electric and traditional) and can convert your regular bicycle into an electric bike.

Want to try out an eBike? Big Bam eBikes has rentals by the hour or by the day. They also have bi-monthly group rides the first and third Tuesday of each month. In addition, they offer a Venice Island eBike Tour, a relaxing, fun, and informational experience. Stop by their shop at 412 East Venice Avenue, across from the Historic Train Depot; 941-240-1717; Summer hours—Monday-Friday 11-4; Saturday/Sunday by appointment. Also visit them at the Venice Farmers Market on Saturday mornings next to the Venice City Hall. BigBamBikes.com

West Venice Avenue: The Heart of the City

West Venice Avenue: The Heart of the City

West Venice Avenue, the gateway to the Gulf, captivates visitors and residents with its tropical beauty. Stunning palm trees tower over the avenue, while hibiscus, jatropha, jasmine, and many other flowering plants and hanging floral baskets provide endless color along the street. And an abundance of shade trees and benches along the sidewalks create an inviting environment for shopping, dinning, and admiring the scenery.

Did you know?
West Venice avenue is home to:

Wonderful parks and green spaces. Centennial Park, with its gazebo and interactive Children’s Fountain, is the center of community events and activities throughout the year. Heritage Park, located in the median along West Venice Avenue from Avenue des Parques to the beach, provides a lovely, peaceful place to stroll. Its lighted banyan trees, historical displays, and memorial to veterans of all service branches make it extra special. Within the City Hall building, there also are two atriums filled with greenery and orchids.

Public art. Sculptures are sprinkled along the avenue in unexpected places. Watching over the southern corners of Venice Avenue and Nokomis Avenue are two bronze statues—Maria and Sophia. Further down the avenue is a mural titled Healing in the Enchanted Garden showcasing area wildlife in wonderful detail. The mural accents the lovely interconnecting walkway from West Venice Avenue to Miami Avenue West—Founders’ Way which pays tribute to the founders of Venice Hospital. Just west of downtown, the Four Seasons statues can be viewed along West Venice Avenue. 

Thirteen historical buildings, including the Schoolcraft Building, the Boussevain Building, the Sarasota Bronx Building, the Nickell Building, Ennes Arcade, the Sanders Building, the Blackburn Building, the Estes Building, the Mohler Building, and the nearby Lord-Higel House. To learn more, pick up a Venice Walking Tour map at Venice MainStreet, 101 West Venice Avenue, Suite 23 or at the information kiosk in Centennial Park. The map also can be viewed online at visitvenicefl.org/historic-walking-tour/.

More than a dozen dining options. Your taste buds will delight in all the choices from Italian and Irish cuisine to pub and American fare. And for special treats include French pastries, fine chocolates, ice cream, gelato and yummy scones.

More than forty different shops and boutiques offering a range of products and services, including men and women fashions and accessories, coastal apparel, jewelry, home décor, bath and body products, children’s toys, handmade candles, hammocks, stationery, book and paper conservation, fine wines, olive oils, and financial and accounting services.

Numerous options if you want to make downtown Venice your home. You can be steps away from dining and shopping on West Venice Avenue by living in an apartment unit on West Venice Avenue. Residential units are located on the second floor of several historic buildings. Imagine breakfast at a charming sidewalk cafe, walk on the beach, shelling, tennis, afternoon coffee, glass of wine, dinner, theater tickets– all within walking distance. 

Bringing Life to John Nolen’s Vision
From the start, city planner John Nolen pictured a walkable, human-scaled small city, with distinct neighborhoods all within strolling distance of a few-blocks-long shopping district along Venice Avenue. The key feature of the Venice plan designated Venice Avenue as a 200-foot boulevard with a 100-foot parkway in the center terminating in a plaza on the beach.

The western portion of this landscaped boulevard is a promenade with a Gulf vista. The boulevard is 120 feet wide in the business section and 200 feet wide in the residential section. From Harbor Drive to Tamiami Trail is the heart of the central business district. The western portion of Venice Avenue with its oak canopy is primarily residential, and includes three Northern Italian-style mansions (at 605, 613, and 625 Venice Avenue West) built in 1926 to house executives of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. Commercial properties also adhered to the design controls to maintain the Northern Italian architectural style and to preserve the visual character of the city.

The Venice Avenue shopping district is full of historical buildings beginning west of Nokomis Avenue.

The Schoolcraft Building (201 West Venice Avenue), built in 1926, had shops on the first floor and apartments on the second. The first floor housed the local telephone switchboard and the Venice Pharmacy. Its exterior is essentially unchanged from its 1926 appearance.

The Boussevain Building (205 West Venice Avenue) was the first commercial building constructed in Venice. Built in 1926 using clay block and brick with steel reinforcements, it housed two retail stores on the first floor and several offices on the second floor. The original retail stores were the Dawson Furniture Company and the Venice Hardware Company. Venice’s first newspaper, the Venice News, had an office on the second floor.

The Sarasota Bronx Building (213, 215, 217 West Venice Avenue) was originally the location of the Shaw Dry Goods Store. Before construction of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in 1939, it housed the Episcopal mission. Later, it was used for a library, dry cleaner, and a hardware store. By 1970, the upper section of the story-and-a-half arched windows were enclosed and a covered walkway was installed.

The Nickell Building (219-221 West Venice Avenue) was first home to Blate’s of Venice Wearing Apparel with two stores on the main floor and four apartments on the second. Later, it housed Rice’s Nestlewood Shop.

Ennes Arcade (225-231 West Venice Avenue), completed in 1927, once housed a hotel, stores, post office, and electric company office. It has two two-story wings, connected by a roofed arcade.

The Sanders Building (247-251 West Venice Avenue), with its original Venetian design, was the second commercial building constructed in Venice. It was originally intended to house a drug store, barber shop, and haberdashery. One of its first tenants was the Rendezvous Tea Shop.

The Blackburn Building (303-305 West Venice Avenue), built in 1926, was designed to house five stores on the ground floor and eight apartments on the second floor. One of the original tenants was a dentist, Dr. George Wheeler.

The Estes Building (307 West Venice Avenue) first housed Venice Stationery, a men’s clothing shop, and a law firm. During the 1940s, it was home to the Venice Gondolier and a radio and television store with a TV in the window for public viewing.

The Mohler Building (311 West Venice Avenue), built in the Northern Italian style, first housed a furniture store and a hardware company. Rental apartments were located on the second floor. Later this building housed the Venice Electric Supply Company and the Venice Tile Company.

The Lord-Higel House, located at 409 Granada Avenue behind Venice City Hall (401 W. Venice Avenue), is the oldest structure in South Sarasota County. Real estate attorney Joseph H. Lord originally built the two-story house in 1896 on 90 acres near Roberts Bay, where he grew citrus. In the early 1900s, citrus grove manager George Higel and his family lived in the house. Acquired by the City of Venice in 2005, the house was moved to its current site and is in the process of being restored. When completed, the first floor of the house will serve as an early settler museum. But even though visitors can’t go inside it yet, the Queen Anne–style home with its wraparound porch still helps paint a picture of what life was like in Venice more than a century ago.

Free Masks for Public Available Downtown

Free Masks for Public Available Downtown

UPDATE: As of 7/9/2020, the majority of masks have been distributed to the public and may no longer be available at the locations listed below.

7/2/2020- Venice MainStreet partnered with the City of Venice Municipal Government to distribute FREE MASKS to the public, while supplies last. One mask packet per person per visit.

Distribution Locations: 
Café Venice- 101 W. Venice Ave.
Celebration Corner- 303 W. Venice Ave.
Ciao Gelato- 317A W. Venice Ave.
Daiquiri Deck- 300 W. Venice Ave.
DanaTyler- 233 W. Venice Ave.
Dockside Waterfront Grill- 509 N. Tamiami Trail
Down Island Way Boutique- 225 Miami Ave. W. #2
Florida Bike and Beach Rentals- 941-412-1411
Heitel Jewelers- 347 W. Venice Ave.
Island Life Hammock Co.- 329 W. Venice Ave.
Lisa’s Classic Rose- 303B W. Venice Ave.
Luxurious Interiors- 205 W. Venice Ave.
Mother’s Cupboard Spice Shoppe- 208 Miami Ave. W.
Nana’s A Children’s Shop- 223 W. Venice Ave.
Patchington- 136-138 W. Venice Ave.
Sharky’s on the Pier- 1600 Harbor Drive S.
The Artful Gem- 209 Miami W.
The Power of One- 238 W. Tampa Ave. Ave. #258
Things I Like- 307 W. Venice Ave.
Venice in Vogue- 310 W. Venice Ave. #102
Venice Island Gallery- 100A W. Venice Ave.
Venice MainStreet, Inc. Office- 101 W. Venice Ave. #23
Venice Wine & Coffee- 201 W. Venice Ave.

Masks are also available at the following (while supplies last):
Venice City Hall Information Center- 401 W. Venice Ave., 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Monday-Friday
Venice Police Department- 1350 Ridgewood Ave., 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday
Venice Fire Station 3- 5300 E. Laurel Road, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday
Venice Area Chamber of Commerce- 597 Tamiami Trail S., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday

Nokomis Avenue, Nassau Street, and Harbor Drive: Cross Streets Connecting the City Together

Nokomis Avenue, Nassau Street, and Harbor Drive: Cross Streets Connecting the City Together

Nokomis Avenue, Nassau Street, and Harbor Drive provide much more than connection to downtown Venice. They also bring their own special charm to the city with numerous parks and green spaces, beautiful murals and artwork, historical buildings, and a variety of shops.

Did you know? The area is home to:

Nearly a half dozen parks and green spaces.
Fountain Park along Nokomis Avenue provides a peaceful and serene setting for pedestrians. The park encircles a beautiful fountain adorned with an original art piece, along with color changing lights in the fountain bowl.
Ponce De Leon Park, a triangular parcel along Nassau Street, provides a peaceful landscaped setting with a statue.
Monty Andrews Arboretum at West Blalock Park is an environmental and educational gem. The arboretum holds over 80 species of trees and palms identified with information signs. There also is a Florida-friendly shrub area, butterfly garden, picnic areas, and four life-size animal sculptures of a Florida panther, sea turtle, manatee, and tarpon.
Venezia Park, just south of the arboretum on Nassau Street, is the center of a historical subdivision. It is landscaped with tall, native long-leaf pines, providing shady walkways and a gathering place for the community. It also has three Venetian Lion statues.
Hecksher Park, along Harbor Drive, caters to the sports enthusiasts with its tennis, pickleball, basketball, shuffleboard, and racquetball courts.
– Harbor Drive also is the gateway to Venice’s southern parks and beaches.

• Two beautiful murals. The murals are located along Nassau Street—a coral reef-themed one near the Intergenerational Fountain (kids splash pad) in Centennial Park and a perfect spot for a selfie at the mural showcasing the spirit of Venice at the corner of West Venice Avenue and Nassau Street South. 

• Numerous historical buildings, including Hotel Venice, Triangle Inn, Blalock House, Levillain-Letton House, Sawyer Building, Banyan House, and Venezia Park Historic District.

• Venice’s Community Center, William H. Jervey Jr. Venice Public Library, and Venice Museum & Archives located in the city’s Cultural Campus, offer a wide variety of educational, recreational, and social resources and activities for the community.

• Nearly 20 different businesses offering a range of products and services, including women’s fashions, jewelry, home décor, beauty salons and spas, accounting and other professional services.

A Closer Look at Its Historical Buildings

The historical buildings along Nokomis Avenue, Nassau Street, and Harbor Drive illustrate well the style of architecture that city planner John Nolen envisioned for Venice in the 1920s. A number of them also are listed in the US National Register of Historic Places.

• The opening of Hotel Venice (200 N. Nassau Street) in 1926 was an important milestone in turning city planner John Nolen’s vision for Venice into a reality. The main entrance with its welcoming courtyard was built facing west and Nassau Street, which was the first street built in Venice. The courtyard was lined with orange trees which were illuminated with small orange globes woven throughout the branches. From 1933 to 1970 it became part of the campus of the Kentucky Military Institute, which spent its winter sessions in Venice. Today, the building serves as a retirement community, and the spacious lobby and dining room are still furnished with the original inlaid cypress beamed ceilings and terrazzo floors.

The Sawyer Building (south Nassau Street) was constructed in 1926 by Harold W. Sawyer to house his grocery and meat market on the ground floor along with eight offices on the second floor. In 1934, the building was purchased by the First Baptist Church and is still used by the church today.

The Banyan House (519 S. Harbor Drive), built in 1927 in the Northern Italian architectural style for Robert Marvin, the Brotherhood of Locomotive’s real estate manager. The house was built of hollow red clay tile with stucco finish. It has terra cotta, patterned ceramic tile and oak flooring as well as original plastered walls, cypress ceilings, and exposed beams.

• The Blalock House (241 S. Harbor Drive), added to the US National Register of Historic Places in 1989, is a two-story Mediterranean Revival style residence constructed of rough cast stucco over a woodframe.

• The Levillain-Letton House (229 S. Harbor Drive), also listed in the National Register, is a two-story Mediterranean Revival style house constructed of textured stucco over clay tile.

The Triangle Inn (351 S. Nassau Street), featuring a castle-like turret, was constructed in 1927 as a two-story rooming house. After changing hands over the years, the building was acquired by the City of Venice in 1991. The City built a new foundation, moved the building from its original location in the 200 block, and restored the exterior to its 1920s appearance. In 1996, it was entered into the National Register of Historic Places. Today, it is home to the Venice Museum and Archives, which holds a collection of more than 30,000 pieces of historical material relating to Venice, Nokomis, Laurel, and Osprey.

• The Venezia Park Historic District, designed around a large trapezoidal-shaped park, contains 47 historical buildings dating from the 1920s.

To learn more, pick up a Venice Walking Tour map at Venice MainStreet, 101 West Venice Avenue, Suite 23 or at the information kiosk in Centennial Park. The map also can viewed online at visitvenicefl.org.

Christmas in July Downtown Sale July 17-18th

Christmas in July Downtown Sale July 17-18th

July 17th & 18th
10am-4pm

Shop the avenues and beyond! Head to downtown Venice for great summer deals during Venice MainStreet’s annual Christmas in July event. Participants include (but may not be limited to) the following Venice MainStreet Partners listed below.

Friday, 17th: Pick up your mask and shopping flyer at the Centennial Park information kiosk and join Venice MainStreet. Look for Santa at the FourThought Private Wealth building at 310 West Venice Avenue around 10am, then catch him socially distancing on the avenues, then playing the trumpet at 1:30pm on the balcony above Venice Island Gallery at 100A West Venice Ave. Don’t miss Mrs. Santa Claus at The Deborah & Dick Miller Team RE/MAX Platinum Realty office at 307-B W. Venice Ave. from 10am to 1pm today. Shop local!

Saturday, 18th: Pick up your mask and shopping flyer at the Centennial Park information kiosk and join Venice MainStreet. Look for Santa at the Venice Farmers Market around 10am, then waving from above Burgundy Square Cafe (227 Miami Ave.) at 1pm, and socially distancing on the avenues. Don’t miss Mrs. Santa Claus at The Deborah & Dick Miller Team RE/MAX Platinum Realty office at 307-B W. Venice Ave. from 10am to 1pm today. Shop local!

East Venice Avenue
Big Bam Bikes- 412 E. Venice Ave.

West Venice Avenue (listed in order by location)
Venice Island Gallery- 100 W. Venice Ave.
Venice Olive Oil Co.- 101 W. Venice Ave.
Bonnell’s Boutique and Winery- 101 W. Venice Ave.
Made In Italy- 117 W. Venice Ave.
Patchington- 136 W. Venice Ave.
Twist- 137 W. Venice Ave.
Eyes on You- 140 W. Venice Ave.
SunBug- 141 W. Venice Ave.
Venice Wine and Coffee Company- 201 W. Venice Ave.
Luxurious Interiors- 205 W. Venice Ave.
southeast salt- 213 W. Venice Ave.
Nana’s A Children’s Shop- 223 W. Venice Ave.
Island Gift Nook- 227 W. Venice Ave.
Dana Tyler- 233 W. Venice Ave.
The Boutique By the Beach- 237 W. Venice Ave.
St. Marco Boutique- 239 W. Venice Ave.
Shirt Stop- 247 W. Venice Ave.
Venice Avenue Creamery- 249 W. Venice Ave.
Dick’s Shoes- 251 W. Venice Ave.
Daiquiri Deck- 300 W. Venice Ave.
Celebration Corner- 303 W. Venice Ave.
Lisa’s Classic Rose- 303B W. Venice Ave.
The Deborah and Dick Miller Team RE/MAX Platinum Realty – 307B W. Venice Ave. (meet Mrs. Santa Claus from 10am-1pm Friday and Saturday)
Things I Like- 307 W. Venice Ave.
Tangi & Jess- 310 W. Venice Ave.
Rose & Leo- 310 W. Venice Ave.
Venice In Vogue- 310 W. Venice Ave.
B & B Bootery- 311 W. Venice Ave.
Ciao Gelato- 317 W. Venice Ave.
Croissant & Co.- 323 W. Venice Ave.
Island Life Hammocks- 329 W. Venice Ave.
Heitel Jewlers- 347 W. Venice Ave.

Miami Avenue West (listed in order by location)
The Wild Thang Boutique- 201 W. Miami Ave.
Island Ice- 203 W. Miami Ave.
Art Escape Gallery- 206 W. Miami Ave.
Mother’s Cupboard Spice Shoppe- 208 W. Miami Ave.
The Artful Gem- 209 W. Miami Ave.
DP Fitness & Wellness- 210 W. Miami Ave.
Down Island Way Boutique- 225 W. Miami Ave.
Bodrum- 225 W. Miami Ave.
Needlefish Yarns of Venice- 258 W. Miami Ave.

Nokomis Avenue
Collectors Gallery and Framery- 114 Nokomis Ave.

Just beyond downtown
Crow’s Nest- 1968 Tarpon Center Dr.
Elephant’s Trunk- 595 Tamiami Trail S.
Hotel Venezia- 425 US 41 Bypass N.
Sharky’s on the Pier and Fins- 1600 Harbor Dr. S.

East Venice Avenue: Exploring the Area Less Traveled

East Venice Avenue: Exploring the Area Less Traveled

Most people, when spending time in Venice, flock to the downtown area. But for those interested in exploring some of the less traveled areas of the city, check out the east side of Venice Avenue in the historic district.

East Venice Avenue and its surrounding area are home to:
– One of the most important historical sites in Venice, the Train Depot. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Venice train depot was constructed in 1927 by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. It was the last stop on the line of the Seaboard Air Line Railway that extended south from Tampa through Sarasota. It now serves as the southern trailhead of the Legacy Trail, which runs along the railroad’s former right of way. Free docent-led tours are provided by the Venice Area Historical Society. Check the Society’s website veniceareahistoricalsociety.org for dates and times.

– Three green spaces—Legacy Park, Ruscelletto Park, and the Venice Urban Forest. Legacy Park is located across from the Historic Train Depot and has a walking trail that connects to the Venetian Waterway Park and Legacy Trail. It has a shaded train-themed playground with a climbing apparatus and swings. Ruscelletto Park, tucked away off North Grove Street, has a sidewalk for walking and biking around a stormwater pond that is home to numerous water birds and other wildlife. The Urban Forest, a green space between the Seaboard Industrial District and the Intracoastal Waterway, will stretch from the Venice Historic Train Depot to Center Road when completed. The first phase is now finished with the planting of hundreds of trees and the creation of several butterfly gardens.

– Several food and beverage establishments, including bike and sports pubs, offering a variety of cuisine—Thai, European, and American.

– More than a half dozen shops catering to your outdoor pursuits, including charter boats; golf carts; electric bikes; fishing, camping and hiking equipment; and beach supplies.

– Pet-related businesses offering grooming to boarding.

– Cultural art enthusiasts providing music instrument rentals and lessons, as well as Clyde Butcher fine art photography, books, and gifts (located just off E. Venice Ave. at 237 Warfield Avenue).

And if that is not enough, the area abuts Seaboard—the beginning of the Industrial District. This area, running parallel to the old railroad tracks, was designated for industrial uses by the town’s first planner John Nolen and has been used for such purposes since the 1920s. Today, it serves as an economic engine, supporting city residents and other businesses. More than 100 businesses operate in this zone, providing an endless array of services—automotive; plumbing; painting; swimming pools; storage; remodeling; water conditioning; window installation; embroidering; personal chef, just to name a few.

Make East Venice Avenue Your Home
Tra Ponti Villaggio is a residential neighborhood in the heart of downtown on the island of Venice located on Tampa Avenue East and East Venice Avenue. Courtyard homes and multi-level townhomes are adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway. It’s a short walk to The Venetian Waterway Trail and Legacy trail for biking and walking and, of course, blocks away from tons of shopping, dining and entertainment downtown.

History, Culture and Businesses Abound on Tampa Avenue

History, Culture and Businesses Abound on Tampa Avenue

Travel back in time with a stroll down Tampa Avenue. It is home to several important historical sites that helped shape the development of Venice: Hotel Venice, San Marco Hotel, and the Orange Blossom Garage. Don’t forget to shop and dine too along this charming avenue!

Hotel Venice (present day assisted living facility located at the corner of Tampa Ave. and Nassau St.) was the first hotel constructed in the city in 1926. Designed in the Italian Renaissance style, the 3-story wood frame building had one hundred luxurious rooms, where potential home buyers could stay when they visited.

The San Marco Hotel (present day San Marco building with businesses and residential units), another 3-story structure built soon after Hotel Venice, offered 13 shops on the ground floor and 92 rooms above. It later became the home of the Kentucky Military Institute from 1933-1970.

The Orange Blossom Garage was built in 1927 to house a gas station, car storage garage, and storefront shops. The strategically located corner building is now home to the Venice Theatre.

Tampa Avenue: Early Catalyst for City Growth
The construction of the San Marco Hotel not only enhanced the city’s hotel capacity, but also its retail space. Built with steel-reinforced, concrete block, it was one of the strongest structures in the city. In 1932, the empty hotel was leased to the Kentucky Military Institute (KMI) for use as its winter headquarters. The first floor was used for classrooms and the upper floors for cadet living quarters. The building is now filled with specialty shops on the ground floor and condominiums on the other floors. An exhibit honoring the nearly 40-year history of the KMI, with various memorabilia—photographs, personal letters, and uniforms, will be completed in 2020.

The Orange Blossom Garage, originally servicing the city’s automobile needs, was used in the 1930s by KMI as an armory, chapel, and arena to hold exhibition basketball games, a focal point of the community. In 1972, the building was purchased by the community-based Venice Little Theatre organization and remodeled as a performance venue. In 2008, the Venice Little Theatre became the Venice Theatre, which is now the largest per capita  community theatre in the United States.

To learn more, pick up a Venice Walking Tour map at Venice MainStreet, 101 West Venice Avenue, Suite 23 or at the information kiosk in Centennial Park. The map also can viewed online at visitvenicefl.org.

Explore and Support Local Businesses and More
Did you know Tampa Avenue has 30+ businesses and restaurants? Fine art and fine dining can be found, along with numerous health and beauty services, as well as real estate services.

Enjoy Public Art
Beyond Tampa Avenue’s rich history, visitors can also take in the beautiful murals. On the East facing side of the Venice Theatre is the aptly named Sharing Paradise in Venice by artist BJ Carson. It is accented by a lovely fountain and the tranquil surroundings of Michael Biehl Park. Along the wall of Tampa Ave. East’s Barclay Pharmacy is a Venetian inspired scene. Stunning stained glass windows can be admired at the Epiphany Cathedral on Tampa Ave. West.

Make Tampa Avenue Your Home
Tra Ponti Villaggio is a residential neighborhood in the heart of downtown on the island of Venice located on Tampa Avenue East and East Venice Avenue. Courtyard homes and multi-level townhomes are adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway. It’s a short walk to The Venetian Waterway Trail and Legacy trail for biking and walking and, of course, blocks away from tons of shopping, dining and entertainment downtown.

The historic San Marco building is also a wonderful place to live. Condominium units are located on the second and third floors and offer beautiful views of the gazebo and green spaces in Centennial Park.